Leslie Nobler

<em>Homes for Refugees</em>

Leslie Nobler, Homes for Refugees, 2020, Digital art, fiber art, photography, 33 x 13 inches (textile), 12 x 4 x 1 inch (mask), Courtesy of Mark R. Suter 

There is a lot of feminist energy bubbling up in the art world, especially with those who employ the medium previously described as fiber art. Now fiber is simply considered another greatly flexible material with which to express deeper content and aesthetic objectives. I use my digital art knowledge to complement that formerly undervalued medium, and owe a debt of gratitude to Joan Truckenbrod, whose legacy joining computer art research with textiles powered me through graduate school. Besides being a versatile substrate, fabric can be considered a politically "loaded" material due to its association with domesticity and the (oppressed/repressed) woman of the past.

I exhibit and disseminate this work online, and in "real spaces;" it reflects my activism as a digital and social justice artist.

–Leslie Nobler

Leslie Nobler, Protect the Refugees from Disease, 2020, Video, 00:27 minutes, Courtesy of the artist

This work (video and scroll/mask) deals with climate change and environmental refugeeism. It interjects global artforms and ideologies, specifically Bojagi (creation of reusable wrapping and blanketing textiles with - oft recycled - fabric scraps) of Korea.

–Leslie Nobler

<em>Barriers II</em>

Leslie Nobler, Barriers II, 2020, Digital and fiber art, 30 x 30 inches, Courtesy of the artist

Barriers II makes use of digital-fiber work as well, hands-on complex layerings of ink and thread, and a "wallpaper" background to address the horror show of Trump immigration and voter suppression.

–Leslie Nobler

Leslie Nobler